Difference between revisions of "Up to Speed"

From The iPhone Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Reddit doesn't use /r/ - it's r/.)
 
Line 13: Line 13:
 
The basic idea here is that there are lots of ways to learn more about jailbreaking, for people of all experience levels and backgrounds. You might want to learn enough to actually find vulnerabilities in iOS (which is a huge undertaking), or you might just enjoy learning a little bit out of curiosity. Go through this list and pick something that looks fun to read!
 
The basic idea here is that there are lots of ways to learn more about jailbreaking, for people of all experience levels and backgrounds. You might want to learn enough to actually find vulnerabilities in iOS (which is a huge undertaking), or you might just enjoy learning a little bit out of curiosity. Go through this list and pick something that looks fun to read!
   
* You can read about general exploitation techniques on Wikipedia, starting with [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulnerability_(computing)#Software_vulnerabilities software vulnerabilities] and [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privilege_escalation privilege escalation]. Learning about types of vulnerabilities can be fun even if you don't have any background yet in programming or security research - it's like learning about how puzzles work. To learn more about security research in general (useful for the beginner), try these links: [http://www.reddit.com/r/netsec/wiki/start Getting Started in Information Security by /r/netsec], [http://www.reddit.com/r/netsecstudents/wiki/resources /r/netsecstudents resources], and [http://pentest.cryptocity.net/ Application Security and Vulnerability Analysis].
+
* You can read about general exploitation techniques on Wikipedia, starting with [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulnerability_(computing)#Software_vulnerabilities software vulnerabilities] and [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privilege_escalation privilege escalation]. Learning about types of vulnerabilities can be fun even if you don't have any background yet in programming or security research - it's like learning about how puzzles work. To learn more about security research in general (useful for the beginner), try these links: [http://www.reddit.com/r/netsec/wiki/start Getting Started in Information Security by r/netsec], [http://www.reddit.com/r/netsecstudents/wiki/resources r/netsecstudents resources], and [http://pentest.cryptocity.net/ Application Security and Vulnerability Analysis].
   
 
* To learn a bit about what a jailbreak actually does to an iOS device, [https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=4127801 see this conversation with saurik] - it explains the main technical changes that a typical jailbreak accomplishes. Here's also another [http://www.reddit.com/r/jailbreak/comments/17q6tk/is_the_ios_jailbreak_scene_dumber_than_android_or/c87w1hg conversation with saurik with a bit about the history of iOS jailbreaking and comparing it to Android rooting] - "I often recommend that people who are interested in one day being able to hack something like iOS go spend some time cutting their teeth on simpler systems, such as Android".
 
* To learn a bit about what a jailbreak actually does to an iOS device, [https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=4127801 see this conversation with saurik] - it explains the main technical changes that a typical jailbreak accomplishes. Here's also another [http://www.reddit.com/r/jailbreak/comments/17q6tk/is_the_ios_jailbreak_scene_dumber_than_android_or/c87w1hg conversation with saurik with a bit about the history of iOS jailbreaking and comparing it to Android rooting] - "I often recommend that people who are interested in one day being able to hack something like iOS go spend some time cutting their teeth on simpler systems, such as Android".

Latest revision as of 02:12, 6 December 2018

So, all of this sounds intimidating. Jailbreak, sign, secpack, unlock, baseband, iBoot, seczone, JailbreakMe, pwnage - there are lots of terms to learn, but most of them are defined here on the wiki. The basics:

  • Activation - to bypass the required iTunes signup.
  • Jailbreak - to allow full write and execute privileges on any Apple TV, iPad, iPhone or iPod touch.
  • Unlock - to allow the use of any mobile phone carrier's SIM.

Think of iPhone as a little computer, even though Apple doesn't want you to. It has a processor, RAM, a "hard drive", an operating system, and a cellular modem on the serial port.

Ways to learn about how jailbreaks work

(If you're more interested in learning how to develop for jailbroken devices, such as extensions/tweaks, check out the iPhoneDevWiki instead.)

The basic idea here is that there are lots of ways to learn more about jailbreaking, for people of all experience levels and backgrounds. You might want to learn enough to actually find vulnerabilities in iOS (which is a huge undertaking), or you might just enjoy learning a little bit out of curiosity. Go through this list and pick something that looks fun to read!

  • Read iOS Hacker's Handbook, published in May 2012: "The award-winning author team, experts in Mac and iOS security, examines the vulnerabilities and the internals of iOS to show how attacks can be mitigated. The book explains how the operating system works, its overall security architecture, and the security risks associated with it, as well as exploits, rootkits, and other payloads developed for it."
  • Read fuzzing for some explanation of how that technique has been used on iOS, and read how to reverse for some inspiration.
  • If you want to really get started, learn assembler for ARM processors. Open Security Training has "Introduction to ARM" materials, for example.
  • Jonathan Levin posts interesting iOS reverse engineering research. His series of books on "*OS Internals" are a definitive reference. In particular, Volume III deals exclusively with security, insecurity, and dissects every modern jailbreak from evasi0n (6.0) through async_wake (11.1.2) in detail.

Now